What it means for Massachusetts

What it means for Massachusetts

With more than 7,100 cases of monkeypox in at least 48 states, the Biden administration has declared the virus a public health emergency. But what could this statement mean for Massachusetts? On Thursday, Massachusetts reported 42 new cases — 157 in total. “We expect testing cases will continue to increase as we’ve had more access to test people, access to more testing before they go back down,” Centers said for the director for disease control and prevention, Dr. Rochelle Walensky. “If we can give this vaccine to a high-risk population, I think we can probably win something in this fight because we’re not doing it. We’re close behind,” said Dr. Mireya Wessolossky of UMass Memorial Health. A vaccination center informed the WCVB that vaccination appointments were booked until September. The move frees up additional resources for vaccines, treatments and follow-up. New York City – the epicenter of the virus – has opened 23,000 more vaccination appointments, but they are only for the first of two shots needed for full protection. “With cases doubling roughly every week, it is paramount that the government prepares a health system to meet vaccine and testing requirements so Americans can stay safe,” New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand said. The CDC estimates that up to 1.7 million people are at high risk. “Everyone’s wondering, how do we get an appointment? And I caught him right when he came,” said Jack Dillon. The FDA said it is evaluating whether it could expand the vaccine supply by taking five doses from a single vaccine vial without compromising safety or efficacy. Almost all cases involved men who had sex with men. However, doctors emphasize that anyone can get the virus. Five children in the United States have been infected. Monkeypox is rarely fatal and symptoms usually go away on their own. “I’ve seen some patients recover from their illness within two weeks, but unfortunately others didn’t recover until three, four, or even five weeks later,” said Dr. Darien Sutton.

With more than 7,100 cases of monkeypox in at least 48 states, the Biden administration has declared the virus a public health emergency.

But what could this statement mean for Massachusetts? On Thursday, Massachusetts reported 42 new cases — 157 in total.

“We expect that testing cases will continue to increase as we’ve had more access to test people, access to more testing before they go back down,” said Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In Massachusetts, 11 sites are making the vaccine available, but they’re appointment-only.

“If we can give this vaccine to a high-risk population, I think we can probably win something in this fight because we’re not doing it. We’re just behind,” said Dr. Mireya Wessolosky of UMass Memorial Health.

A vaccination center informed the WCVB that vaccination appointments were booked until September.

The move frees up additional resources for vaccines, treatments and follow-up. New York City – the epicenter of the virus – has opened 23,000 more vaccination appointments, but they are only for the first of two shots needed for full protection.

“With cases doubling roughly every week, it is paramount that the government prepares a healthcare system to meet vaccine and testing requirements so Americans can stay safe,” New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand said.

Health officials said more than a million doses of vaccine are going to states, but right now that’s not enough to cover all beneficiaries. The CDC estimates that up to 1.7 million people are at high risk.

“Everyone says how do we get an appointment? And I caught him right when he came,” said Jack Dillon.

The FDA said it is evaluating whether it can expand vaccine supplies by taking five doses from a single vaccine vial without compromising safety or efficacy.

Almost all cases involved men who had sex with men. However, doctors emphasize that anyone can get the virus. Five children in the United States have become infected.

Monkeypox is rarely fatal, and symptoms usually go away on their own.

“I’ve seen some patients recover from their disease within two weeks, but unfortunately others didn’t recover until three, four, or even five weeks later,” said Dr. Darien Sutton.

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