Bond over Cooking – Spotlight News – The home of The Spot 518

fFamilies who want to spend more time together can do just that in a fun way by working together on something they already do every day. Cooking meals together can add some fun to a chore that is already part of everyday life for many families.

Children can learn a lot from cooking, because preparing recipes can reinforce school lessons. Family cooking nights are also a great opportunity to create lasting memories. Various sources indicate that children are more likely to remember experiences from their youth than the gifts they received. Some of these cherished experiences can be enjoyed in the kitchen with mom and dad.

Cooking together as a family not only creates lasting, fun memories, but it can also mean that kids complain less about food because they have a hand in creating it themselves. In addition, cooking together promotes a special sense of togetherness and can create an informal, safe space for conversation.

Here are some ways to start cooking as a family:

Organize age-appropriate tasks. Little hands can only handle so much. A toddler can load and stir ingredients, while an older child or teen may be ready to chop or stovetop fry ingredients.

Expect some chaos. Parents and other adults should step into any meal prep process with kids and expect things to get a bit messy. It may be possible to minimize clutter by setting up workspaces covered with plastic tablecloths that can be folded and shaken in the trash. Encourage children to sit down so they don’t accidentally make a mess in another part of the house.

Start with simple recipes. A first foray into the family kitchen should involve a recipe that is easy to prepare and may not require too many ingredients. After that, build on each achievement and get bolder with each subsequent recipe. The apple turnover recipe below is a fun and delicious dish to start with, and little hands can help peel the apples and fold the squares of dough.

Make it a multi-generational experience. For many families, Sunday was an opportunity to meet up at Grandma’s and spend time together. Relive this tradition by hosting weekly or monthly family dinners where everyone can participate in bringing the food to the table. This is an ideal opportunity for grandparents to pass on family recipes and delight grandchildren with fun stories and memories.

Plan a little more time. The preparation time will probably take a little longer if several hands are stirring in the pot. Adults should resist the urge to take over when children may not be doing things right. If meals have to be on the table at specific times, start an hour or two earlier than usual to allow for confusion and even a possible restart.

Eliminate as many distractions as possible. The kitchen may be the heart of the home, but standing near knives and other cooking utensils and tools can be dangerous. Distractions such as televisions or phones can distract attention and potentially result in injury from pots boiling over or children getting too close to hot flames.

enjoy together with mum and dad in the kitchen.

Cooking together as a family not only creates lasting, fun memories, but it can also mean that kids complain less about food because they have a hand in creating it themselves. In addition, cooking together promotes a special sense of togetherness and can create an informal, safe space for conversation.

Here are some ways to start cooking as a family:

Organize age-appropriate tasks. Little hands can only handle so much. A toddler can load and stir ingredients, while an older child or teen may be ready to chop or stovetop fry ingredients.

Expect some chaos. Parents and other adults should step into any meal prep process with kids and expect things to get a bit messy. It may be possible to minimize clutter by setting up workspaces covered with plastic tablecloths that can be folded and shaken in the trash. Encourage children to sit down so they don’t accidentally make a mess in another part of the house.

Start with simple recipes. A first foray into the family kitchen should involve a recipe that is easy to prepare and may not require too many ingredients. After that, build on each achievement and get bolder with each subsequent recipe. The apple turnover recipe below is a fun and delicious dish to start with, and little hands can help peel the apples and fold the squares of dough.

Make it a multi-generational experience. For many families, Sunday was an opportunity to meet up at Grandma’s and spend time together. Relive this tradition by hosting weekly or monthly family dinners where everyone can participate in bringing the food to the table. This is an ideal opportunity for grandparents to pass on family recipes and delight grandchildren with fun stories and memories.

Plan a little more time. The preparation time will probably take a little longer if several hands are stirring in the pot. Adults should resist the urge to take over when children may not be doing things right. If meals have to be on the table at specific times, start an hour or two earlier than usual to allow for confusion and even a possible restart.

Eliminate as many distractions as possible. The kitchen may be the heart of the home, but standing near knives and other cooking utensils and tools can be dangerous. Distractions such as televisions or phones can distract attention and potentially result in injury from pots boiling over or children getting too close to hot flames.

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